Alan Lowery

Paying the Price: Killing the Children of Iraq

"For almost 10 years of extraordinary isolation imposed by the UN and enforced by America and Britain, have killed more people than the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan - including half a million young children." After Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, the United Nations (backed strongly by the US and UK) imposed harsh sanctions on Iraq that lasted for 10 years (1991-2001); the harsh restrictions on imports of everything, including access to key medicines, resulted in over a million deaths, more than half a million of which were women and children. That's more deaths than the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan and 9/11 combined. The purpose was regime change, but it never came. The overwhelming majority of those killed were ...

New Rulers of The World, The

Never before has the gulf between rich and poor been so vast and inequality so widespread. The facts of globalization are revealing a small group of powerful individuals...Just two-hundred giant corporations dominate a quarter of the world's economic activity. General Motors is now bigger than Denmark. Ford is bigger than South Africa." In order to examine the true effects of globalization, Pilger turns the spotlight on Indonesia, a country described by the World Bank as a model pupil until its globalized economy collapsed in 1998. The film examines the use of sweatshop factories by famous brand names, and asks some penetrating questions. Who are the real beneficiaries of the globalized economy? Who really rules the world now? Is it governments or ...

Apartheid Did Not Die

"Apartheid based on race is outlawed now, but the system always went far deeper than that. The cruelty and injustice were underwritten by an economic apartheid, which regarded people as no more than cheap expendable labor. It was backed by great business corporations in South Africa, Britain, the rest of Europe, and the United States. And it was this apartheid based on money and profit to allow a small minority to control most of the land, most of the industrial wealth, and most of the economic power. Today, the same system is called - without a trace of irony - the free market." John Pilger was banned from South Africa for his reporting during the apartheid era. On his return thirty ...